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when to harvest cannabis without a microscope

when to harvest weed without microscope

I’m a first-time cannabis grower and my first plants are starting to flower, but I’m not sure exactly sure when I’m supposed to harvest them. How do I know my buds are ready? Also, is there anything I can do with the fan leaves after harvest, or do I just throw them out?

As the cannabis flower reaches maturity, more of the pistols will become red or brown. A good rule of thumb is to harvest when just over 50 per cent of the pistols have become red or brown in color. The naked eye method is good for beginners who do not have access to a magnifying glass or microscope.
Having a magnifying glass or microscope allows the grower to determine when to harvest more accurately depending on his or her personal preferences. All in all, a magnifying glass or microscope is a valuable tool for harvesting and an investment worth making.

With the naked eye, the grower should closely watch his or her flowers until the pistols (little white hair protruding from the flowers) start turning red or brown.
Due to the low percentage of cannabinoids they contain, many growers dispose of the fan leaves. Personally, I like to make a coconut oil extract with my fan leaves. I do this by heating water and coconut oil in a large pot (I use one of my water bath canning pots).
After 12 hours, the coconut oil will separate from the water and become hard. Discard the water and scrape the bottom of the hardened coconut oil to remove any sludge left by the plant material.
There are two common methods to determine when a cannabis flower is ready for harvest: with the naked eye or with a magnifying glass or microscope.
If possible, use a magnifying glass or microscope to determine the appropriate time to harvest your cannabis flowers. A magnifying glass or microscope allow a gardener to observe the trichomes (the small mushroom-like glands that contain most of the cannabinoids).

You do not want to heavily boil the leaves; a light simmer is sufficient. After cooking, strain the water/coconut oil mixture through cheese cloth to remove the leaf material. The remaining mixture can be placed in the refrigerator for separation.

There are two common methods to determine when a cannabis flower is ready for harvest: with the naked eye or with a magnifying glass or microscope.With…

Once the plant is ready for harvesting, it will simply not consume as much water like in the stages before. The plant simply did its biological purpose: it produced ripe flowers that are ready for male seeds.

Just make sure not to harvest while the hairs on your buds are still white. At this stage, the plant is still flowering and the majority of the pistils will appear straight.
Once the hairs get darker and start curling up, you should be good to go. But be sure to check out the other signs as well, just to be safe.

It’s easy — clear trichomes look like polished glass and milky trichomes look like frosted glass.
I mean, if anyone knows the best then it’s the guys who harvested their plants hundreds of times: Pigeons 420 and NVclosetmedgrower are just some of the guys who do a tremendous job at explaining this.
If you harvest too soon then your buds will not be as potent as they can, whilst if you take them off too late you’re gonna end up with an altered cannabinoid profile which may give you different effects than what you were initially going after (read: Less THC than planned).
Pigeons 420 is one of my favorite cannabis YouTubers, case closed. The guy is a master at explaining how weed growing works, so I trust him when he says that hairs are the primary thing he’s looking at, come harvesting time.
There’s a lot of them, but which approach should a beginner grower go for?

Avoid: there are a lot of growers who tell you to go for majority amber, but in my opinion this is too late. For maximum THC levels go for 70% milky and you’ll be fine.

Knowing when to harvest cannabis is a fine combination of knowledge and supreme gut feeling. Check out the 4 signs you need to know before harvesting.

I’m a first-time cannabis grower and my first plants are starting to flower, but I’m not sure exactly sure when I’m supposed to harvest them. How do I