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are springtails good or bad for a soil grow + rep

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I’ve got springtails too. I did a lot of reading about them and have done the following, whether they are harmless or not.

Firstly, I notice that mine look like a cluster of mini grains of white rice. I didn’t see that aspect mentioned anywhere.

I also read that mosquito dunks are supposed to work. I’ve had one in the res. for over 48 hours and I don’t see a difference.

In my second smaller garden, which I didn’t think was infected, but it is, I am able to try other solutions, because I just harvested and that means cleaning and disinfecting time anyway.

I flushed all the water from the drain pipes into the res after emptying the majority of water from the res. The remaining water that drained from the pipes into the res was crammed full of springtails. I poured vinegar on them and they were dead within 15 minutes. Once I have cleaned all the bins and set up the system again, I will flush the whole system with a strong vinegar solution and then rinse a couple of times to neutralize the pH again. That should kill anything in the pipes.

The big question is how to kill the springtails in the big garden which is 1 month into veg. I don’t want to harm the plants with a vinegar solution now. If I wait and vinegar (douche) my bins after flowering, I risk allowing the infestation to return to the small garden. I don’t think $20.00 of mosquito dunks is working.

Alienwidow
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I’ve got springtails too. I did a lot of reading about them and have done the following, whether they are harmless or not.

Firstly, I notice that mine look like a cluster of mini grains of white rice. I didn’t see that aspect mentioned anywhere.

I also read that mosquito dunks are supposed to work. I’ve had one in the res. for over 48 hours and I don’t see a difference.

In my second smaller garden, which I didn’t think was infected, but it is, I am able to try other solutions, because I just harvested and that means cleaning and disinfecting time anyway.

I flushed all the water from the drain pipes into the res after emptying the majority of water from the res. The remaining water that drained from the pipes into the res was crammed full of springtails. I poured vinegar on them and they were dead within 15 minutes. Once I have cleaned all the bins and set up the system again, I will flush the whole system with a strong vinegar solution and then rinse a couple of times to neutralize the pH again. That should kill anything in the pipes.

The big question is how to kill the springtails in the big garden which is 1 month into veg. I don’t want to harm the plants with a vinegar solution now. If I wait and vinegar (douche) my bins after flowering, I risk allowing the infestation to return to the small garden. I don’t think $20.00 of mosquito dunks is working.

the question is are springtails good or bad for a soil grow im reading that they are healthy for the soil anyone got any input ??

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    spring tails.

    How do I kill these little bastards?! I had a infestation back in early June. I hit them with a lot of nematodes, then I kept the soil wet for a week, and finally I dried them out for a week and a half to try to kill the remaining spring tails. When the springtails were gone my plants flourished and grew leaps and bounds I thought this had done the trick until I noticed today that I have some weak plants for no apparent reason again. I checked the soil and sure enough the springtails have come back with a vengeance. The research I have done says that they shouldn’t harm the plant but in the same breath says that they feed on the small root hairs of the plant. My plants mostly look ok but haven’t grown much in the past three weeks and the plants with the heaviest amount of springtails are my smallest, lightest in color and have the smallest bud starts on them. Is this somehow a coincidence? If they don’t cause damage then why are my only sick plants infested with springtails?
    I want to be a responsible grower and not use heavy pesticides but I need to be realistic. The last time I tried to treat these little bastards it took three and a half weeks to do the treatment (if you count the week waiting for the nematodes to get here). I figure that I’m 4 to 5 weeks from harvest and need these bugs gone as soon as possible. Does anyone have any suggestions for a effective solution that wont kill the plant or damage the environment? What about neem oil? If I flood my pots with it would it do anything to the springtails?

    Any help or insight is appreciated.
    thanx Bull.

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    they are dirt bugs. they are very small and bend in the middle like a inch worm but they jump around by doing so. Weird little bugs.

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    Springtails.
    Jeffrey Hahn, Extension Entomologist
    Stephen Kells, Extension Entomologist

    common soil springtail.
    Photo: Le Requin

    Folsomia candida, a very common soil springtail.

    Springtails are one of the most common insects in the environment, although they are inconspicuous and are often overlooked. When suitable habitat occurs, they can develop tremendously large numbers and are one of the most abundant insects. One source estimates you may find millions of springtails naturally in one hectare (about 2.5 acres) of land. However, springtails can be a nuisance when they occur in and around homes and other buildings.

    Springtail close-up
    Photo: Le Requin

    These insects are very small, commonly between 1/16th and 1/8th inch long. They have moderate length antennae and are usually slender, elongate insects, although there is a group of springtails that is round and stout. Most springtails are dark-colored, brown, grey or black although some species are white, and some are even iridescent and brightly colored.

    Springtails are wingless and do not fly but they can jump, using a specialized forked appendage called a furcula, located underneath the abdomen. When not in use, the furcula is tucked under the body, set like a mouse trap. When it is released, it extends down rapidly propelling the springtail forward, jumping up to several inches.

    Don’t confuse springtails with fleas. While both insects are small, fleas are flattened from side to side and are very hard-bodied, making them very difficult to kill by crushing. Springtails have a more rounded body, are soft-bodied and are easily crushed.

    Snowfleas
    Springtails
    are associated with damp conditions and organic debris and are found outdoors in soil, leaf litter, lichen, under bark, decaying plant matter, rotting wood, and other areas of high moisture. They are found in many different habitats, feeding on fungi, pollen, algae, or decaying organic matter. Springtails are also commonly found in the soil of houseplants. However when conditions are suitable, you can also find springtails indoors, especially in bathrooms, basements, and kitchens.

    Sometimes springtails can be found outside in the wintertime. Snowfleas, Hypogastruna nivicola, is a particular species of springtail; it is one of the few insects which can be found active on snow during winter. As soon as the ground begins to thaw in late winter or very early spring, snowfleas become active. Their dark colored bodies are conspicuous against the white background of the snow and they often congregate in large numbers. Despite their abundance, they are harmless.

    The abundance of springtails in and around homes can vary from just a handful to very large numbers. Fortunately, regardless of their abundance, springtails are harmless to people; they do not bite or sting us. Rashes have been reported when people have been closely associated with large numbers, but it is uncertain if the skin condition is a result of the springtails or another agent that is typically associated with high moisture in structures. Springtails do not damage food products, clothes, furniture or any property. They are just nuisances.

    Springtails that infest houseplants are found in soil that is excessively damp or in soil mixes contain a high percentage of peat. They feed on decaying roots and fungi and rarely, if ever, damage plants.

    There are several reasons why springtails may be found indoors. They are commonly found in areas of high moisture, e.g. around plumbing leaks, areas of condensation, and damp basements.

    Sometimes the source of high moisture may occur outdoors. If excessively moist conditions occur near the home, that can encourage large numbers of springtails adjacent to the home which can then move indoors. High springtails numbers can be associated with mulch. It is also possible when it is excessively dry outdoors that springtails may move indoors to find moisture.

    Springtails can also be found in the soil of overwatered houseplants and sometimes adjacent areas.

    Nonchemical

    If you are finding just a small number of springtails, just ignore them or physically remove them by hand or with a vacuum. However, if you are seeing persistent number of springtails, they are associated with a moisture problem. The best management is to dry out these areas with a fan or dehumidifier as springtails do not tolerate dry conditions. Also remove any wet wood, especially if it is moldy. Make any structural changes to correct the moisture problem. Springtails are generally a temporary problem and die when moisture levels are reduced.

    If springtails are moving indoors from the outside, check around the house for moisture problems. This could include rainspouts that do not carry water far enough away from the foundation, landscapes that slope towards buildings, excessive irrigation, or non-functioning drainage systems around the building. It could even be a moisture problem with the roof. Correct existing moisture conditions to decrease the number of springtails. When necessary, remove or reduce the amount mulch that is around the foundation of your home.

    If you have a problem with springtails in houseplants, let the soil dry out and water less frequently but more deeply.

    Although it may be tempting to spray a springtail problem with an insecticide, the products available are generally not very effective against them. Moisture control is the most effective strategy.

    Last edited by Le Requin; 09-03-2013 at 05:10 PM .

    How do I kill these little bastards?! I had a infestation back in early June. I hit them with a lot of nematodes, then I kept the soil wet for a week, and finally I dried them out for a week and a half to try to kill the remaining spring tails. When the springtails were gone my plants flourished and grew leaps and bounds I thought this had done the trick until I noticed today that I have some weak plants for no apparent reason again. I checked the soil and sure enough the springtails have