southern oregon seed

When exposed to the wrong pH, the molecular form of these nutrients actually changes. Nutrients in the wrong chemical form become unavailable to your plant roots. Exposing nutrients to the correct pH reverts them back to a form your roots can take in. Managing pH is especially important when using bottled nutrients.

Using bottled nutrients gets the nutrients to your plant faster (which equals faster growth), but it also means you are in charge of managing the pH. These systems deliver nutrients directly to the plant roots in their simplest form, but there is no “middle man” between you and the plant roots, leaving you in charge. So if you’re using bottle nutrients, make sure you manage your pH! When starting your cannabis grow with properly amended and composted soil, pH isn’t as important for you to manage. Instead of managing pH, you need to manage and care for the bacteria and microorganisms in the soil. In a proper composted soil setup, the microorganisms deliver nutrients to your roots in the right form. There are many kinds of popular rowing containers for cannabis gardens… Standard plant container with saucer. Here’s a breakdown of those different container options… Standard plant container with saucer.

This is a container with a hole at the bottom for drainage, plus a saucer to catch the water. Smart pots (fabric containers) More oxygen to the roots. Prevents plants from getting “root-bound” via “air-pruning” from the sides. Since growing medium dries out from the sides, smart pots make it difficult to overwater your plants, but that also means you will end up watering more often. Since smart pots dry out faster than regular cannabis containers, you should get double the size as your normally would, and it’s recommended your final size should be at least a 5-gallon container (anything smaller than that dries out in just a day or two!). So if you would normally get a 2-gallon container, you’d want to get a 5-gallon smart pot. Need an extra large saucer or a tray to capture runoff water – smart pots don’t come with a saucer or tray and they seep out water from the sides. Helps prevent plants from getting “root-bound” via “air-pruning” from the sides. Since growing medium dries out from the sides, air pots make it difficult to overwater your plants, but that also means you will end up watering more often. Although water seeps out the sides when watering, air pots are tall and thin so you can use a regular size saucer for each container. Like a regular plant container except instead of having drainage holes out the bottom, they are located near the bottom on the sides. This leaves a small pool of water in the bottom of the container after watering. Need to water less often with hempy buckets, which is a great advantage when growing larger plants that drink a lot. Can sometimes lead to root or nutrient problems since stagnant water can sit at the bottom of the container and any nutrient buildup never gets rinsed out. The two most popular ways of capturing runoff water in small containers are… Individual saucers for each container. Most regular plant containers come with a matching saucer. These are placed under the plant and catch the runoff water for each individual plant. When using a container that lets air in through the sides (such as a smart pot or air pot), you will need a larger than normal saucer to capture all the runoff water, since water will be seeping down the sides of the container. One of the problems with saucers is you usually remove them from under the plants to empty the runoff water (always remove runoff – never let it sit so it’s seeped back up into the growing medium!). This is easy with just a few plants, but can become a problem when growing with a lot of plants in a small space. It can be difficult to get to the saucers in the back after the grow space has been filled up with plants. If you’re having trouble emptying out all your plant saucers, you may want to consider an alternative to regular saucers… Trays. If you want to capture the water from a lot of plants in one space, I recommend using a tray set one a slight incline, so the part of the tray furthest away from you is raised slightly off the ground.. With even a tiny incline, the runoff water will pool at the front of the tray, and a wet vac can be used to capture all the water from the plants.

This can be a lot easier than emptying saucers, depending on your setup. As a bonus to using a tray, you won’t have to move your plants around as much, which results in better and faster growth. Plants don’t like being moved around if you can help it. I found the “Bucket Head” attachment at Home Depot which costs about $25 and can be attached to any standard bucket, turning it into an ultra-cheap wet/dry vacuum. Final Size Container for Desired Plant Size – General guide.

When choosing the size of your containers, you must think about the final size of your plant. Bigger plants will need bigger containers, while smaller plants grow best in a relatively small container.

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