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selling to dispensaries in michigan 2020

Michigan says caregivers can no longer sell surplus marijuana to provisioning centers

Michigan’s medical marijuana dispensaries will no longer be able to buy and sell untested cannabis products from caregivers.

The new rules are actually old rules that the state’s Marijuana Regulatory Agency says it will enforce. That’s following a court ruling earlier this week.

The ruling allowed dozens of unlicensed provisioning centers to remain open. But the ruling also allows the state to move forward with rules requiring the centers to get their marijuana products only from licensed growers or processors.

“In particular we want to make sure licensed provisioning centers knew there was no longer an allowance to bring in caregiver products in directly,” says Andrew Brisbo, the executive director of the Marijuana Regulatory Agency.

Centers will be allowed to dispense marijuana products they purchased from caregivers before April 30th, but only with patient consent.

Brisbo says he can’t put an estimate on how long it will take for the centers to exhaust what’s left of their untested supply.

The new rules don’t just leave some caregivers with a surplus of marijuana. They will be allowed to sell it to licensed growers and processes, who will then be able to test it to see if it meets state standards.

Here’s a rundown from the Marijuana Regulatory Agency’s notice to cannabis businesses:

Licensed Provisioning Centers

  • Licensees may obtain marijuana products only from a licensed grower or licensed processor.
  • Licensees must obtain patient consent on a form provided by the MRA prior to selling any marijuana products obtained from a caregiver on or before April 30, 2019 that have not been tested in full compliance with the law and administrative rules.
  • Licensees must enter all inventory into the statewide monitoring system immediately upon receipt.
  • Licensees, before any sale or transfer, must verify – and confirm with government issued photo identification – with the statewide monitoring system that a patient or primary caregiver holds a valid registry identification card.
  • Licensees must enter all sales in the statewide monitoring system and must determine sales will not exceed daily purchasing limits.
  • Licensees must notify the MRA within one business day of becoming aware of any adverse reaction to a marijuana product sold or transferred.

Licensed Growers and Licensed Processors:

  • Licensees may obtain marijuana products from caregivers.
  • Licensees must enter all inventory into the statewide monitoring system immediately upon receipt.
  • Licensees may only transfer marijuana products that have been tested in full compliance with the law and administrative rules.
  • Licensees must tag or package all inventory that has been identified in the statewide monitoring system.
  • Licensees must transfer marijuana products by means of a secure transporter, except where exempted under law.
  • Licensees must notify the MRA within one business day of becoming aware of any adverse reaction to a marijuana product sold or transferred.

Michigan’s medical marijuana dispensaries will no longer be able to buy and sell untested cannabis products from caregivers. The new rules are actually old

Dominant source being cut from Michigan marijuana markets, possibly spurring higher prices

Marijuana buds at Elite Wellness on Monday, Dec. 9, 2019 in Thetford Township. (Jake May | MLive.com) Jake May | MLive.com

LANSING, MICHIGAN — What has been the primary source of marijuana sold on Michigan medical dispensary and recreational store shelves is being phased out.

Beginning Oct. 1, medical marijuana caregivers will no longer be allowed to sell any marijuana to licensed businesses, the Marijuana Regulatory Agency said in a bulletin issued Monday, March 2.

“The Marijuana Regulatory Agency’s goal is to stimulate business growth while protecting patient safety,” the agency bulletin said. “To support that goal, the (Marijuana Regulatory Agency) will implement a phase-out process for the transfer of marijuana and marijuana products into the regulated market from caregivers.

“The phase-out process will occur between March 1, 2020 and October 1, 2020, with a final termination of all external marijuana transfers on September 30, 2020.”

Beginning March 1, medically licensed growers and processors were barred from purchasing any non-flower marijuana products from caregivers, including THC vaping cartridges, edibles and concentrates. Caregiver sales were limited to marijuana flower only to medically licensed growers and processors.

Marijuana customers may experience even higher prices at stores across the state due to the changes.

“Anytime there are regulatory changes we can expect market fluctuations including pricing,” Michigan Cannabis Industry Association Director Robin Schneider said. “In this case they are giving us seven months notice to prepare for the change and we are grateful for that. There are many new licensed grows that just came online or are almost ready so we are hopeful with this advance notice we will be better positioned to meet demand in time for the deadline.”

The Michigan Cannabis Industry Association is a trade organization comprised of nearly 200 licensed marijuana business.

” . I want to say that as an association we respect and support the important role of the caregiver which in accordance with the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act is to grow and provide medical marijuana directly to their five patients,” Schneider said., “Many of our licensed members began as caregivers and haven’t forgotten where they came from. I expect that as an association we will continue to be supportive of caregivers who are intimately assisting their patients, family members and loved ones by growing or purchasing their medicine for them.”

Schneider personally participated in crafting the 2018 recreational marijuana legalization ballot initiative that set the stage for a licensed recreational market and supported 2016 legislation that created the licensed medical marijuana market.

“The laws that govern our licensing program, both medical and recreational, require that cannabis sold in the regulated market be grown and tracked from seed to sale,” she said. “We very intentionally included the 100 plant grow licenses in our recreational ballot initiative in hopes that more caregivers and independent entrepreneurs will have an opportunity to participate in the licensed and regulated market.”

Dominant source being cut from Michigan marijuana markets, possibly spurring higher prices Marijuana buds at Elite Wellness on Monday, Dec. 9, 2019 in Thetford Township. (Jake May | MLive.com)