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Sweet ZZ Grape Ape x Grapefruit 550 - 600 gr/m 2 80 - 150 cm 7 - 9 weeks THC: 22% (aprox.) / CBD: Low 20% Sativa, 80% Indica 500 - 550 g/per plant (dried) 160 - 200 cm Late September Stoned, relaxed. Grape Ape x Grapefruit 550 - 600 gr/m 2 80 - 140 cm 7 - 9 weeks THC: 22% (aprox.) / CBD: Low. 20% Sativa, 80% Indica 500 - 550 g/per plant (dried) 160 - 200 cm Late September Stoned, relaxed. Fruit Spirit Blueberry x White Widow 375 - 425 g/m 2 80 - 120 cm 7 - 8 weeks THC: 18% (aprox.) / CBD: Low 60% Sativa, 40% Indica 475 - 525 g/per plant (dried) 175 - 220 cm Early October High (sweet taste) Fruit Spirit.

Blueberry x White Widow 500 - 550 g/m 2 80 - 120 cm 7 - 8 weeks THC: 18% (aprox.) / CBD: Low. 60% Sativa, 40% Indica 500 - 550 g/per plant (dried) 175 - 220 cm Early October High (sweet taste) AUTOFLOWERING. Autoflowering strains get their name from their ability to flower without a change in the light cycle. They are easy to grow, fast to flower, and maintain stealthy sizes. PROS CONS No need to change the light cycle Lower yield Small and compacte Typically less THC; not as potent as most photoperiod strains Usually higher in CBD Difficult to clone Rapid flowering times - Hardy genetics make them easy to grow and beginner-friendly - Ideal for guerrilla growing - PROS CONS No need to change the light cycle Lower yield Small and compact Typically less THC; not as potent as most photoperiod strains Usually higher in CBD Difficult to clone Rapid flowering times - Hardy genetics make them easy to grow and beginner-friendly - Ideal for guerrilla growing - HOW ARE AUTOFLOWERING GENETICS MADE? Breeders create autoflowering seeds by using _Cannabis ruderalis_ genetics—the subspecies that contains the autoflowering trait. Cannabis ruderalis adapted to the shorter growing seasons and colder climates of Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Central Asia.

The shorter summer in these regions forced the subspecies to begin flowering on its own accord. These plants need to reproduce before the short summer comes to an end and the freezing temperatures of autumn grip the landscape. They developed the ability to flower based on time and age, instead of a change in light exposure. In contrast, indica and sativa subspecies are photoperiod varieties. They require shorter light cycles to trigger flowering—an environmental cue that signals the imminence of autumn and colder days ahead. They are shrubby, small, low in THC, and produce low yields. They use these plants to infuse well-known photoperiod strains with the autoflowering trait. You’ll benefit from autoflowering seeds if you want a harvest as soon as physically possible. Maybe you want to boost turnover, or set up and take down your growing operation within a small window of time. You can still achieve a good yield in a small tent by growing several plants and utilising the sea of green (SOG) method. Autoflowering strains are well-suited to discreet growers. You can grow these small plants in modified buckets and boxes, and even conceal them among companion plants outdoors. The RQS catalogue features many different tastes, potencies, and varieties. • Green Gelato Automatic provides incredible levels of THC. Detroit Council extends ban on recreational marijuana sales to spring. Detroit — The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to extend its temporary ban on recreational marijuana sales until spring as it works on a law to govern how they operate and ensure residents can participate. City Councilman James Tate, who is leading the effort, introduced the ordinance last week to push back the city's opt-out period, stressing the potential billion-dollar industry should have a "pathway for Detroiters to be gainfully employed." Councilman James Tate answers questions from the public during the hearing for recreational marijuana businesses in the city. (Photo: Clarence Tabb Jr., The Detroit News) A draft ordinance prepared in the fall, he noted during a Tuesday public hearing, didn't go far enough to help residents of the post-bankrupt city. "The rush is really trying to get it right, not to get it done. I'm not going to push an ordinance that is not ready," Tate said. "Detroit has had a situation where financially, the economic downturn was drastic . this is an opportunity for us to make our residents whole." The council voted on the extension after multiple advocates, residents and prospective marijuana business owners expressed frustration with the delay that they contend is holding people back from opportunity. Others applauded the council for its effort to set a standard for inclusion. Matthew Abel, a marijuana attorney, asked the council how long it was going to "kick this can" down the road. Abel urged council members to solicit more public feedback and publish a draft of the proposed ordinance.

Abel of Cannabis Counsel addresses the council about the lack of recreational marijuana in the city. (Photo: Clarence Tabb Jr., The Detroit News) Abel noted Detroit Police Chief James Craig recently noted that black market sales of marijuana are leading to violence. Adding to that market, Craig said, is the lack of venues in Detroit where recreational marijuana can be legally purchased. "The chief of police says the illegal market is causing illegal transactions. What's killing people is not marijuana, it's the prohibition of marijuana," Abel said. "We need consumption lounges in the city, otherwise people are going to continue to walk down the street and smoke marijuana." Michigan voters approved a ballot proposal to legalize the adult-use of recreational marijuana in November 2018. Since then, more than 1,400 municipalities have instituted bans to prevent marijuana businesses from opening in their communities.

The Marijuana Regulatory Agency issued the first recreational license in November. Tate first introduced an ordinance in the fall to temporarily prohibit adult-use marijuana establishments in the city through Jan. The potential billion-dollar industry, he's said, should have a "pathway for Detroiters to be gainfully employed." As of last week, there were 64 licenses in the state, 36 of which are retailers, according to David Harns, a spokesman for the state's Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs. Retail sales for recreational marijuana this month surpassed $10 million in Michigan.

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