northern lights cannabis indica the office

We will cover their key characteristics, as well as the effect they can have when consumed. Armed with this information, you can continue to build an overview of the legal cannabis industry’s core commodity. Appearance Capable of towering over six metres in height, the sativa species is native to tropical climates, where long periods of intense sunlight are the norm. This adaptation to its environment has allowed the sativa species to develop large pointed leaves with minimal markings or patterns. Their branches are outstretched with 3–6 inches between nodes.

Growing characteristics Sativa strains are capable of dealing with higher concentrations of humidity compared to their indica counterparts. However, sativas have a longer flowering time, with plenty of space needed for them to reach their full potential. Cultivating the sativa subspecies requires a knowledgeable hand, and a carefully prepared growing environment or greenhouse. Effects/ uses Sativa strains commonly incite feelings of euphoria and a head-focused high when consumed. They can also be used in small doses to boost energy levels, creativity, and divergent thinking. Sativas are not the first choice for medical markets, unless dealing with specific medical conditions. Sativa-dominant strains are an ideal choice for the recreational food and drink market. Appearance The indica subspecies is the opposite of sativa strains in virtually all respects. It grows much shorter, with denser branch structure. Leaves are also smaller, with broader, slightly marbled fingers.

Grown correctly, indica strains resemble a small Christmas tree, with the largest leaves at the base of the plant. Growing characteristics Indicas are less adept to humid conditions, and can easily fall victim to mould, unless monitored. They are usually the preferred option for recreational growers as they have a shorter flowering period. This means that in controlled environments (indoor grow room) it is possible to harvest multiple times per year. Effects/ uses Indica strains produce a body-centric effect that can be used to soothe muscles, aches and pains. Certain indica strains can also help induce sleep or tackle insomnia. These attributes usually make indica-dominant strains preferable for medicinal use. Appearance Existing somewhere between the sativa and indica subspecies, ruderalis have small, thick leaves with only a few branches and a fibrous stem. They do not grow very tall, only reaching up to four feet in height. Native to central and eastern Europe and Asia, the ruderalis subspecies has become adept at thriving in poor, or hostile environments. Growing characteristics The fundamental difference between ruderalis and sativa or indica is how the subspecies flowers. Usually, a cannabis plant would use the change in seasons to prompt the shift from the vegetative phase to flowering. However, due to the lower sunlight intensity in Europe, the ruderalis subspecies has developed an inbuilt timer for flowering—regardless of seasonal changes. Its genetics determine the length of time it spends in the vegetative stage before automatically flowering. Effects/ uses Ruderalis strains have low levels of THC and produce lower yields in comparison to the indica or sativa subspecies. They are not used in the recreational market due to their rather poor return, although they can be cross-bred with either indica or sativa strains to improve yields. The ruderalis subspecies can contain higher levels of CBD and be useful for medicinal markets, as long as sophisticated extraction equipment is used. The fibrous stems also make ruderalis strains more suitable for use in clothing, or textiles. Difference between Cannabis Sativa, Indica and Ruderalis. Published : Jan 13, 2016 Categories : Strain information. There are thousands upon thousands of different cannabis strains, all with varying growing traits, tastes, aromas, yields and effects; but they all have something in common: They belong to one of three families of cannabis – sativa, indica or ruderalis. Each of these names are used to describe three very different and unique sets of genetics found within the Cannabaceae family of plants (of which all cannabis varieties belong to), each with their own traits. Understanding the difference between these genetic families can help growers make an informed decision about what they want to grow, and the preparations they will need to take to get the right marijuana for them. Cannabis sativas are physically the largest of the three families, and are also probably the most popular. They originated in the wilds of equatorial countries, between 30 degrees north and 30 degrees south of the equator. In these equatorial countries, the hours of daylight do not fluctuate throughout the year in the same way it does across the rest of the globe.

Cannabis sativa plants have evolved to take advantage of this, and continue to grow as they flower. For this reason sativa plants tend to look a lot more airy and loose then their other family counterparts. It has also resulted in longer average flowering times than indica or ruderalis varieties, but a proportionally higher yield as well. The leaves of the cannabis sativa plant are long and spindly, often described as being finger-like – much like the stereotypical representation of a cannabis leaf. Cannabis sativa plants tend to have very high concentrations of THC and relatively low levels of CBD, which has been further strengthen by human breeding – the market has always traditionally valued high THC strains. This tends to result in sativas having the following effects: - A cerebral head buzz - Energizes and uplifts - Motivation - Focusing and/or increasing alertness - Inspiring and increasing creativity - Reduces nausea - Helps relieve depression/promotes a sense of wellbeing - Stimulates the appetite. Cannabis indica plants are most commonly recognized by their short and stocky stature.

This variety of cannabis originated in the wilds of sub-tropical countries, such as Pakistan and Afghanistan (which is sometimes reflected in a strain’s name).

Menu

Get in touch