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marijuana induced panic attacks

How to Handle a Cannabis-Induced Panic Attack

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Cannabis doesn’t affect everyone in the same way, and even if you’re a seasoned consumer, you might not have the same reaction every time you use it.

Sometimes it might work exactly as you intended, whether you’re using it to ease mental health symptoms or stimulate your appetite. But other times, it may increase feelings of stress and anxiety, especially if you’re using a product high in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

Cannabis-induced anxiety might show up as a panic attack in some cases, which can result in:

  • sweating or shaking
  • a sudden feeling of doom you can’t explain
  • worries about others watching or judging you
  • racing heartbeat
  • trouble breathing
  • intense feelings of fear
  • chest pain or choking sensations
  • stomach pain or nausea
  • dizziness
  • numbness, tingling, or chills
  • a sense of detachment from reality or your body

It’s also common to worry about dying or losing control. Though these feelings can be frightening, they’re pretty normal with panic attacks.

The good news is, panic attacks don’t pose any significant danger. They also go away on their own, usually within 10 minutes or so. Of course, those 10 minutes might feel like an eternity when panic has you in its grip.

Here are some ways to find relief in the meantime.

Panic attacks can feel different for everyone, but it’s not unusual to wonder if you’re experiencing something serious, such as a heart attack or overdose, especially if you’ve never had a panic attack before.

The fear that happens with a panic attack is perfectly real. The threat, however, isn’t, and reminding yourself that the panic will pass can help you start to calm down.

You might certainly experience some unpleasant symptoms after ingesting too much cannabis, but this scenario isn’t life threatening (even if it feels that way).

Calming exercise

  • Sit down somewhere comfortable — the sofa, the floor, your favorite chair.
  • Close your eyes and take a deep breath.
  • Say, “I’m safe. I’m having a panic attack. I’ll feel better soon.”
  • Repeat this mantra, breathing slowly and naturally, until the feelings of panic begin to life.

Using cannabis on an empty stomach can intensify the effects of THC, leading to a more serious high than you expected.

There’s an easy fix, though: Grab a snack. Even if you weren’t all that hungry to begin with, a light meal can help counteract the effects of cannabis and soothe the panic.

Some evidence also suggests terpenes like limonene, found in lemons, can help ease the effects of THC. So if you have lemons on hand, zest and squeeze one into a glass of water. Add sugar or honey if you’re not a fan of the sour pucker.

If you don’t have lemons, check your cabinets. Another common source of terpenes is black pepper.

If you have whole peppercorns, chew on a couple. If you have a pepper shaker on hand, give it a careful whiff. Just make sure you don’t actually inhale it, as that will create an entirely different set of unwanted symptoms.

Hyperventilation, or very rapid breathing, often happens during a panic attack.

Breathing too quickly can prevent you from getting enough carbon dioxide, which can cause tingling in your extremities and make you feel dizzy or faint. These symptoms can alarm you and end up making the panic attack worse.

Slowing down your breathing can sometimes help you begin feeling better right away. If you have a go-to technique, it can’t hurt to give it a try.

If not, try the breathing exercises below to help yourself relax.

Simple deep breathing exercise

You’ll breathe with your mouth for this technique:

  • Get comfortable. It may help to sit or stand with your back against something supportive.
  • Slowly inhale for 3 to 4 seconds, paying attention to the sensation of your breath filling your lungs. Some people find it helpful to place a hand on their stomach and feel it expand with each breath.
  • Hold the breath for a second or two.
  • Slowly exhale for 3 to 4 seconds.
  • Continue until the lightheaded feeling passes and you can breathe more naturally on your own.

Alternate nostril breathing

This technique uses your nose, so you’ll want to keep your mouth closed:

  • Close one nostril.
  • Breathe in slowly through the other nostril for 2 to 4 seconds.
  • Hold that breath for 1 to 2 seconds, then slowly exhale. Do this twice.
  • Close the other nostril and repeat the process.
  • Continue switching sides and breathing through one nostril at a time until your breathing slows and you feel calmer.

OK, so you’re pretty sure you’re having a panic attack, but that knowledge doesn’t calm you down automatically. Your thoughts are spinning, your heart is racing, and you can’t catch your breath. You know you’re not dying, but you still feel awful.

While it’s sometimes a little challenging to stay present through overwhelming anxiety and panic, grounding techniques can help you step back from waves of fear and anchor yourself.

Here are a few exercises to get you started:

  • Run your hands under cold or warm water.
  • Touch or pick up the first three objects you see, one at a time. Your favorite blanket, a book, the TV remote — anything works. Run your fingers over the contours of the object and focus on its colors and sensations. Even simply holding something can offer a point of connection with reality.
  • Cuddle or stroke your pet.
  • Use the 5-4-3-2-1 technique to identify and list things around you: five sounds, four textures, three visible objects, two different scents, and one taste.

Cannabis is usually linked to feelings of relaxation, and things can sometimes backfire for a range of reasons. Here’s how to deal.