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how to get burst plant seeds

How to get burst plant seeds

Phase Five: Scattering the Seeds

A seed contains everything necessary to produce a new plant. When a seed leaves the fruit or flower we call it dissemination. If the seed is in fruit, dissemination occurs when the fruit falls from the plant or when an animal carries the fruit away. Some of these seeds end up in the soil and grow into new plants.

Springtime Soil is ideal for growing seeds. This soil is damp and warm both of which are important for seed survival. If a seed does not land in moist soil it will stay dormant until moisture is present, and then it will grow.

Seeds can be scattered in many ways. Some seeds are scattered by the wind, some are carried away by birds and insects, some float in water, others are forced away from the plant by exploding pods, and still others hitchhike on animals and people.

An example of a seed that travels by water would be the coconut seed. A coconut has a thick outer shell and is light-weight inside, which allows it to float for up to several months. When the coconut finally arrives on dry land, it is cracked open by animals or it rots, releasing the seeds inside.

An example of a hitchhiking seed would be a burdock. A burdock is covered with a spiky shell that sticks to passing animals and people. In this way the seeds are taken to a new location to grow.

Maple seeds are carried by the wind. They fall off the tree and can be blown for many miles because they are light-weight. Dandelions are also scattered this way.

The last method of scattering seeds is explosion. Some plants have seeds contained in large pods. When the pod burst open the seeds are sent flying through the air. Milkweed scatters its seeds this way.

Phase Five Vocabulary Definitions:

Dissemination – When a seed leaves the fruit or flower of a plant.

Dormant – When a seed falls to the ground and does not grow because it lacks moisture.

Hitchhiking – When a seed is contained in a protective shell that has spikes or is covered in a sticky substance that allows the seed to attach itself to an animal or person.

Coconut – The seed case of a coconut plant. A coconut can float in water.

Burdock – A seed that travels by Hitchhiking on animals and people.

Maple Seed – A seed contained within a shell that can travel in the wind.

Milkweed – An example of a plant that scatters its seeds by growing exploding pods.

How to get burst plant seeds Phase Five: Scattering the Seeds A seed contains everything necessary to produce a new plant. When a seed leaves the fruit or flower we call it dissemination. If

Examples of Plants That Disperse Seeds by Shooting Them

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Some plants disperse their seeds forcefully by ejecting them. Sometimes the tension is so great, seeds may be ejected up to 200 feet away from the mother plant. This method of seed dispersal is called “ballistichory,” a label that hints at the projectile-like emergence of seeds from their pods or capsules. This type of seed dispersal occurs because the fibers in the dried fruit pull against each other to create tension, and when the tension is great enough, the fruit splits open and the walls of the fruit spring back, flinging the seeds out with force.

Plants in the Fabaceae Family

One of the largest groups of plants that uses ballistichory is the pea family, or Fabaceae. This is just one type of plant that shoots seeds when touched and the pod is cracked open. Lupins (Lupinus spp.), a garden favorite that’s hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 3 through 9, form columns of pea-like fruits that burst open when dry. Orchid trees (Bauhinia spp.), hardy in USDA zones 9 through 11, bear large pods that can fling seeds nearly 50 feet. Gorse (Ulex spp.), an aggressive broom-type plant that is considered a noxious weed in some states, makes a popping noise when the seed pods burst open.

Most Plants in Euphorbiaceae Family

Another plant that shoots seeds when touched is Euphorbiaceae. The Euphorbia family produces segmented seed capsules that somewhat resemble a peeled orange in shape. Examples of plants in this family include bitterbark (Petalostigma spp.), the sandbox tree (Hura crepitans), and the rubber tree (Hevea spp.)

Bitterbark is a native of Australia and hardy in USDA zones 9 through 11. The dried fruits explode and send seeds three feet into the air. The sandbox tree sends its seeds hurling nearly 150 feet, and the exploding seed pods create a loud noise comparable to a rifle discharge. The sandbox tree is hardy only in USDA zones 10 through 11. The rubber tree , the source of natural rubber, can shoot its seeds 50 feet from the tree. It’s hardy in USDA zone 10 through 11.

Acanthaceae: Exploding Shrubs

The Acanthus family (Acanthaceae) produces a number of shrubs that distribute seeds through explosive action. Most produce highly ornamental flowers. The Mexican petunia (Ruellia spp.) has small petunia-shaped flowers and produces pods that disperse seeds up to 10 feet away. Mexican petunias are hardy in USDA zones 8 through 10, and may be an invasive plant in some states. Justicia produces colorful flower spikes and is hardy in USDA zones 9 through 11. The seed capsules explode when mature. Firecracker plants (Crossandra spp.) are aptly named because of their pretty orange flowers and exploding seed pods. These capsules dry out first then pop open once they become moist again.

Malvaceae: Mallow Family Plants

Some plants in the mallow family (Malvaceae) disperse seeds via ballistichory. The common garden vegetable okra (Abelmoschus spp.) is a plant that shoots seeds when touched, projecting its seeds several feet. Okras are annuals that are hardy in USDA zones 4 through 11. The kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra, also known as cotton tree) is native to South America and produces cream-colored flowers with an unpleasant smell. The pods burst open, sending both seeds and the exploding seed pod’s cottony insulation into the wind. Kapok trees are hardy in USDA zones 10 through 11.

Examples of Plants That Disperse Seeds by Shooting Them. Some plants disperse their seeds forcefully by ejecting them. Sometimes the tension is so great, seeds may be ejected up to 200 feet away from the mother plant. This method of seed dispersal is called "ballistichory," a label that hints at the …