how do nectar collectors work

For those who live in extremely humid areas (where the high humidity in the air is preventing buds from drying even with a fan), there are more resources at the bottom of this article on how to dry out your buds properly. Learn how one grower was able to dry his buds even with 85-95% relative humidity in his area. The most important aspect of the drying process is to dry them slowly, and in such a way that it’s easy for you to check on them regularly. So don’t hide them in the back of a closet that’s hard for you to get to. You need to be able to check on your buds every day, and more often is possible (especially during your first few harvests, until you know how buds dry in your personal environment).

Step 4: Continue drying until outsides of buds feel dry to the touch, and smaller stems snap instead of bend, usually 3-7 days. Buds will “snap” off without leaving a stringy trail. If buds are dry sooner than 3-4 days, it may mean you’ve dried your buds a little too fast, but that’s okay! It’s difficult to get things exactly right at first because the size and density of the buds, and your environment can vary so much! Even if buds have been dried too quickly, they still benefit from the curing process, but it may take a little longer than normal for buds to be fully “cured.” If you accidentally remove all moisture from the buds (dry your cannabis for too long), the curing process slows down dramatically, or may even come mostly to a halt. However just like buds dried too quickly, overdried buds will still cure, but it takes longer. When hanging your buds upside down to dry, your buds are ready to be placed in jars when the outsides of all the buds are completely dry to the touch, but not brittle.The bigger stems will still be bendy but the smaller stems will snap when buds are ready to pull down. When buds are finished drying, you’ll be able to snap off the smallest buds with your fingers without leaving a “string” of plant behind.

“Stringiness” means there’s still too much moisture inside. Although the buds may feel overdry at this point, if the bigger stems are bendy it means there’s still water hidden inside that will work its way to the outside of the buds during the curing process. This is the perfect time to pull down your buds and jar them. If you pull down your buds before the smallest stems snap, you’ll find they tend to be too wet once you put them in jars, so you’ll end up having to dry them more anyway. But if you can find a stem that snaps, it’s better to take buds down too early since it’s a lot easier to take water away than add it back. With drying methods where the buds have been removed from the stems, it’s important to jar buds as soon as the outsides feel dry to the touch, before the buds dry all the way through, since there won’t be any stems to “hold onto” some extra water. If buds were completely separated from the stems during the drying process, they’re ready as soon as the outsides feel dry to the touch. It’s ideal to pull buds down at the right time because you can slowly draw out the moisture from the middle of the buds, which allows the curing process to continue. As long as the outside of your buds feel dry to the touch, it is unlikely for mold to grow. Mold generally grows where the outsides of your buds feel moist or damp to the touch. Some growers choose to sample some of their buds at this point, but be aware that the smell, taste, and potency are not even close to optimal yet. Buds that haven’t been cured are also usually harsh, tend to bother the back of your throat, and give some people headaches. But don’t worry, your bud quality continues to improve as you cure the buds and help break down some of the “bad stuff” that you don’t want in your buds. From this point, your goal is to store your buds in a controlled environment. You want to stabilize the relative humidity at around 60-65% when the buds are placed in an enclosed container. This is the correct environment to cure your marijuana buds to perfection. If you’ve taken your buds down when the smallest stems snap, but the larger ones bend, then chances are your buds will already create the perfect humidity when they’re in the jars. Optimal Curing Environment (in Jars): Room Temperature – Around 70°F ( 21°C) 60-65% Humidity. Place your dried cannabis buds in jars for the “curing” process. When the humidity is at 60-65%, your buds will feel completely dry on the outside, but won’t crumble or seem dusty in your hands (which usually means the humidity is too low). Here’s how to jar your buds the right way every time, without any guesswork on your part. The ideal storage containers for marijuana buds are wide-mouthed glass mason jars . These can be found pretty easily at big grocery stores, most craft stores, online, and at superstores (like Wal-mart).

As cannabis cultivation has become more popular, these jars are appearing in more and more stores. You want mason jars that hold 1 quart (labeled “Quart jars” or sometimes 32oz jars).

Each of these jars will hold about an ounce of dried buds (usually about 0.75-1.25 ounces of bud will fit in one jar, but it can be more or less depending on the consistency of your buds). One-quart glass mason jars have proven to be a great size for proper curing. Bigger jars are more likely to encourage mold – I’ve learned this one from experience 🙁 Other types of jars often don’t seal the right way, which can prevent buds from curing properly. For example, the type of jars that have a rubber seal don’t seem to cure buds right for me. I always use quart-sized glass mason jars, and you’ll see that the majority of growers do the same.

Menu

Get in touch