dinafem blue cheese

It is a wise idea to re-pot photoperiod cultivars, however with autos, transplanting them will only slow growth down and oftentimes shock the plants. Decide on the final pot size, or flower bed site you wish to sow your seedlings and then leave them. An undisturbed autoflowering plant will perform much better than one that has been moved around during the pinnacle weeks of development.

It is not possible to take clones from autos and have them stay in a vegetative state. Due to the nature of the Ruderalis, the clones will begin to flower once rooted and the removal of the lower branches will be detrimental to the yield of the plants. Avoid being too heavy when it comes to training , and stick with low stress training and pruning. Topping and fimming can cause plants to flower with a short height. Autos react very well to being tied down as it exposes the inner canopy to more direct light-enhancing growth and production. Just because your plants are autoflowering, does not mean it is necessary to hammer the plants with nutrients. This is how many inexperienced and overzealous growers over water their roots, causing issues with nutrient uptake and inviting bad bacteria to grow around the roots.

Water in moderation and treat auto the same as you would any other plant. Flushing makes such a big difference to the overall experience when smoking your harvested flowers. There has to be a point where you only feed your plants plain water or a solution of water with enzymes. With spring out of the way and summer slowly cranking into gear, our thoughts turn to the great outdoors and the possibility of some nice bud grown under that free grow light in the sky. However, they do come with their own set of headaches; you have no control over environmental factors like you do indoors, your plants are susceptible to all sorts of pests, disease and, worse still, crop robbers. With spring out of the way and summer slowly cranking into gear, our thoughts turn to the great outdoors and the possibility of some nice bud grown under that free grow light in the sky. However, they do come with their own set of headaches; you have no control over environmental factors like you do indoors, your plants are susceptible to all sorts of pests, disease and, worse still, crop robbers. Growing in a domestic greenhouse is a great way to utilise the natural light to grow you favourite plants, it offers the grower a level of environmental control and it also negates having to deal with a lot of the problems encountered with guerrilla outdoor grows. Yes, you will still have to fight off pests but they will be of the insect variety rather than rabbits, deers and the local thug’s pit bull! If you’re growing in a residential area, a greenhouse provides the ideal opportunity to hide a few cannabis plants amongst your veg and herbs, keeping them shielded from the neighbours view and the smell relatively well contained. If you’re in a rural area then there’s no reason not to be a little braver and do a few more plants, just be prepared for the smell. Remember, a carbon filter isn’t an option in a greenhouse, it will fail due to the high humidity levels. Extracting through an in-line ozone generator will be your only option if the smell gets too much. There are lots of options when it comes to purchasing a greenhouse, the first thing to do is to pick your style; lean-to, free standing or poly tunnel. From experience, we’d recommend against the cheap and cheerful portable greenhouses. They’ll blow away on a windy day and cook your plants on a warm day! Lean-to greenhouses are assembled against the exterior wall of your house and retain any heat that permeates through the wall. They’re a great option if space is at a premium because they are essentially a ‘half sized’ greenhouse. Free standing greenhouses are usually apex shaped, like the shape of a house, and can be aluminium or wood framed. One important point to remember is that, the larger the frame, the larger the shadows they will cast over your plants. Poly tunnels are traditionally used in commercial horticulture but are also available in domestic sizing. They consist of a curved aluminium frame with polythene sheeting stretched over it to form a solid structure. They’re usually cheaper than traditional greenhouses, but the sheeting will need replacing every 3-5 years. Unless you’re very tight on space for your greenhouse, it’s a good idea to buy the next size up from the size you were going to buy.

It’s nice to have some space to work and move around in.

Plus, you’ll always fill any unused space with equipment and growing media. Whatever size and style of greenhouse you decide on, it’s best to go for a diffused or semi-diffused coverings or panels, rather than clear panels. Clear panels deliver direct light, which is great for propagating or bringing on young plants, as the direct sun will keep everything warm and prevent seedlings from getting leggy. However, to grow your plants full cycle you really need to diffuse the light to stop all the plants fighting for the light and also prevent hot spots from forming.

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