Categories
BLOG

did god smoke weed

The God Thing

I am a recovering marijuana addict who was raised during the Peace and Freedom Movement of the turbulent ’60s in Berkeley, California. When my girlfriends said that they would never smoke pot or do drugs I kept quiet because I always knew that I would…someday (and for my entire adult life). It wasn’t my choice to start using, though. My dad got me stoned when I was very young, which I do not remember. When I was six, my father dropped seven hits of LSD, flipped out, and committed himself to the mental ward at a state hospital. He was released in 1971 and I haven’t seen him since. When I was nine I was given a hit of mescaline by a family friend. My path was set when I carved “F*** You!” in the sand in six-foot letters. Shortly after that, I was stealing all the pot I could find and lying about it. By the time I turned thirteen I was smoking all day every day. I moved out when I was fifteen to run from the pain and to use to my heart’s content.

From day one I did drugs for only one reason—to escape. I had experienced so much trauma by the time I was seven that I simply did not want to feel or be in my own skin. The chaos around me was far more than I could handle as a young child. I remember consciously choosing my friends based on my marijuana use and dropping people who did not fit in with my need for getting high. My life was shaped by chasing the high from that point on. I was dealing and putting myself in dangerous places to support my lifestyle. I had no regard for anyone else and blamed the whole world for my problems, but now I know that the problem was really the disease within me. I continued in the vicious cycle of addictive behavior for a long time, even into my recovery.

The God Thing I am a recovering marijuana addict who was raised during the Peace and Freedom Movement of the turbulent ’60s in Berkeley, California. When my girlfriends said that they would never

“God put weed here for us to smoke”: A mixed-methods study of religion and spirituality among adolescents with cannabis use disorders

Affiliations

  • 1 a Suffolk University , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.
  • 2 b Massachusetts General Hospital , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.
  • 3 c Harvard Medical School , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.
  • PMID: 29558286
  • PMCID: PMC6430642
  • DOI: 10.1080/08897077.2018.1449168

Free PMC article

“God put weed here for us to smoke”: A mixed-methods study of religion and spirituality among adolescents with cannabis use disorders

  • Search in PubMed
  • Search in NLM Catalog
  • Add to Search

Authors

Affiliations

  • 1 a Suffolk University , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.
  • 2 b Massachusetts General Hospital , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.
  • 3 c Harvard Medical School , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.
  • PMID: 29558286
  • PMCID: PMC6430642
  • DOI: 10.1080/08897077.2018.1449168

Abstract

Background: A growing literature on adults with substance use disorders (SUDs) suggests that religious and spiritual processes can support recovery, such that higher levels of religiosity and/or spirituality predict better substance use outcomes. However, studies of the role of religion and spirituality in adolescent SUD treatment response have produced mixed findings, and religiosity and spirituality have rarely been examined separately.

Methods: The present study examined religiosity and spirituality as predictors of outcomes in an outpatient treatment adolescent sample (N = 101) in which cannabis was the predominant drug of choice. Qualitative data were used to contextualize the quantitative findings.

Results: Results showed that higher levels of spirituality at posttreatment predicted increased cannabis use at 6-month follow-up (β = .237, p = .043), whereas higher levels of baseline spirituality predicted a lower likelihood of heavy drinking at posttreatment (odds ratio [OR] = .316, P = .040). Religiosity did not predict substance use outcomes at later time points. When asked to describe the relation between their religious/spiritual views and their substance use, adolescents described believing that they had a choice about their substance use and were in control of it, feeling more spiritual when under the influence of cannabis, and being helped by substance use.

Conclusions: Together, findings suggest that for adolescents with SUDs, religion and spirituality may not counteract the use of cannabis, which may be explained by adolescents’ views of their substance use as being consistent with their spirituality and under their control.

Keywords: Adolescent; cannabis; mixed methods; religion; spirituality.

Together, findings suggest that for adolescents with SUDs, religion and spirituality may not counteract the use of cannabis, which may be explained by adolescents' views of their substance use as being consistent with their spirituality and under their control.