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If the Halloween spirit hits you, a carved out pumpkin makes an excellent DIY bong. Though similar to an apple pipe, pumpkins are great because they come in different shapes and sizes. From miniatures to huge pumpkins, there’s a ganja gourd waiting to be made for smokers of all tolerances – so find a pumpkin that’s the right size for you, then follow along to the helpful video below. Sturdy and found growing wild in much of the world, or maybe in your carefully cared for home garden, bamboo is a no-brainer material for DIY paraphernalia. The video below shows how to make a bamboo bong; for many folks, the allure of using bamboo is that it can be used to make bongs of (sometimes ridiculously) great heights.

For cannabis creatives interested in something smaller, that hits very hard (and very harsh), try your hand at crafting a bamboo steamroller. “What is this, a bong for ants?” Could be, but it’s also a super easy, super portable, and super awesome DIY bong – plus, with Tic Tacs costing around a buck, it’s very cost effective. Basically, take an empty Tic Tac container, put a little water in it, cut a hole in the side for a bowl piece, and enjoy on the go. Watch the video below to see a Tic Tac Bong in action. When scrambling to make a DIY bong, you need something that is on-hand, easy to modify, and that you won’t miss too much. Everybody has some tupperware at home, it’s cheap, airtight, and won’t be a struggle to cut some holes in.

Even better, using the different shapes and sizes of the tupperware you have makes for a fun exercise in DIY Marijuana MacGyver-ing. Check out this thread at Grasscity to get some inspiration. Rowdy sports fans were on to something with the beer helmet – sip brews while keeping both hands free for nachos. Cannabis users can create their own version for hands-free enjoyment by creating their own beer helmet bong, which uses two cannisters instead of beer cans for the ultimate double-chamber creation. You’ll likely need a friend to light it (both chambers at once!), but if you offer to switch off rounds using the helmet, you’ll find some willing participants. Some might call this desecrating a cherished childhood toy – we think it’s an upgrade that makes it more practical for today’s day and age. The zapper gun used for Duck Hunt and other games on the original Nintendo Entertainment System can be easily modified to become a homemade pipe that will impress your friends, inspire a trip down memory lane, and soon have you all giggling like that damn dog. Follow these tips to build your own Zapper Gun Pipe. Warning: don’t get too excited before attempting to make this awesome N64 controller pipe. Think it through: will I still have enough controllers to play Mario Kart four-player? Then proceed with the below tutorial from Stoner Tourism, which will show you how to replace the joystick with a bowl piece and create one of the coolest homemade pieces of paraphernalia we’ve ever seen. LEGOs challenged you as a kid to build the coolest constructions you can think of. Well, there’s still challenges to be taken head on as an adult, and some resourceful smokers have created the wildest bongs they could imagine using LEGOs. Below, check out the Taj Mahal of LEGO bongs – it’s got a small stash box, lighter holders, and windows that let you see the water bubbling. Disclaimer: Nothing on this website should be considered legal advice or as a substitute for legal advice. Please respect the local, state and federal marijuana laws. Cannabis Cultivation: The Light Spectrum and Ways to Raise THC Levels. Creating an ideal environment for cannabis plants is only achievable by understanding the principles of nature - the light spectrum is a factor that cannot be ignored. Most cannabis growers have multiple objectives in mind when planning an indoor grow. Drafting scenarios to achieve higher yields, increase THC levels, or simply to improve the overall health of a plant is an integral part of their hobby. This element of strategic planning involves the challenge to link knowledge of different scientific fields and to match those findings to a technical solution that helps to achieve predefined goals. Besides dedication and passion, it is the willingness to learn that differentiates good growers from future experts – so let us try to grow the royal way and learn what it takes to cultivate cannabis of exceptional quality. Today, we are looking at fundamentals of physics, and learn how the light spectrum affects the growth of a cannabis plant. The sun emits energy in the form of solar radiation including gamma rays, x-rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, and even radio waves. Life on Earth is only possible because the ozone layer blocks this radiation, and reflects most of it back into space. This filtering process only allows wave lengths between 300nm and 1100nm to reach our plants and an even smaller portion of this light is visible to us.

It is often referred to as the light spectrum, color spectrum or visible spectrum, and ranges from 380nm to about 750nm. 180-280nm - UVC: Extremely harmful and luckily almost completely absorbed by the ozone layer 280-315nm – UVB: Cause of sunburn and suspected to increase THC levels (!) 315-400nm – UVA: Not absorbed by the atmosphere, commonly known as black light 380-750nm – The visible light spectrum: Bands of wave lengths represent visible colours 700nm-1mm – Infrared light: Not visible above 750nm but noticeable as heat on our skin. COLOUR TEMPERATURE (KELVIN) AND HOW IT AFFECTS YOUR PLANTS. When shopping around for a grow light, you will likely come across the term "colour temperature". This is essentially a way to describe the light appearance provided by a bulb, and is measured in Kelvin (K). Colour temperature doesn’t mean the physical temperature of your light, but the degree of warmth or coolness of a light source—the “visual temperature”. When a light has a higher degree of Kelvin, it has a more blueish appearance. On the other hand, a bulb with a lower degree of Kelvin emits a “warmer”, reddish light.

Colour temperature is normally used as a way to describe how the light produced by a lamp looks to the human eye. For some types of lights, such as LEDs or fluorescent lamps, it doesn’t describe a light’s spectral distribution or wavelength. Without going too deep into physics here, the light from an incandescent bulb radiates light spanning the entire visible light spectrum.

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