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cannabis expectorant

Cannabis expectorant

Cannabis is the best natural expectorant to clear the human lungs of smog, dust, and the phlegm associated with tobacco use.

Marijuana smoke effectively dilates the airways of the lungs, the bronchi, opening them to allow more oxygen into the lungs. It is also the best natural dilator of the tiny airways of the lungs, the bronchial tubes—making cannabis the best overall bronchial dilator for 80% of the population (the remaining 20% sometimes show minor negative reactions).

(See section on asthma—a disease that closes these passages in spasms—UCLA Tashkin studies, 1969-95; U.S. Costa Rican, 1980-82; Jamaican studies 1968-74.)

Statistical evidence—showing up consistently as anomalies in matched populations—indicates that persons who smoke tobacco cigarettes are usually better off and will live longer if they smoke cannabis moderately, too. (Jamaican, Costa Rican studies.)

Millions of Americans have given up or avoided smoking tobacco products in favor of cannabis, which is not good news to the powerful tobacco lobby—Senator Jesse Helms and his cohorts. A turn of the century grandfather clause in U.S. tobacco law allows 400 to 6,000 additional chemicals to be added. Additions since then to the average tobacco cigarette are unknown, and the public in the U.S. has no right to know what they are.

Many joggers and marathon runners feel cannabis use cleans their lungs, allowing better endurance.

The evidence indicates cannabis use will probably increase these outlaw American marijuana-users’ lives by about one to two years—but they can lose their rights, property, children, state licenses, etc., just for using that safest of substances: cannabis.

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Cannabis expectorant Cannabis is the best natural expectorant to clear the human lungs of smog, dust, and the phlegm associated with tobacco use. Marijuana smoke effectively dilates the

Effects of marijuana smoking on the lung

Affiliation

  • 1 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. [email protected]
  • PMID: 23802821
  • DOI: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201212-127FR

Effects of marijuana smoking on the lung

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Author

Affiliation

  • 1 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. [email protected]
  • PMID: 23802821
  • DOI: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201212-127FR

Abstract

Regular smoking of marijuana by itself causes visible and microscopic injury to the large airways that is consistently associated with an increased likelihood of symptoms of chronic bronchitis that subside after cessation of use. On the other hand, habitual use of marijuana alone does not appear to lead to significant abnormalities in lung function when assessed either cross-sectionally or longitudinally, except for possible increases in lung volumes and modest increases in airway resistance of unclear clinical significance. Therefore, no clear link to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been established. Although marijuana smoke contains a number of carcinogens and cocarcinogens, findings from a limited number of well-designed epidemiological studies do not suggest an increased risk for the development of either lung or upper airway cancer from light or moderate use, although evidence is mixed concerning possible carcinogenic risks of heavy, long-term use. Although regular marijuana smoking leads to bronchial epithelial ciliary loss and impairs the microbicidal function of alveolar macrophages, evidence is inconclusive regarding possible associated risks for lower respiratory tract infection. Several case reports have implicated marijuana smoking as an etiologic factor in pneumothorax/pneumomediastinum and bullous lung disease, although evidence of a possible causal link from epidemiologic studies is lacking. In summary, the accumulated weight of evidence implies far lower risks for pulmonary complications of even regular heavy use of marijuana compared with the grave pulmonary consequences of tobacco.

Regular smoking of marijuana by itself causes visible and microscopic injury to the large airways that is consistently associated with an increased likelihood of symptoms of chronic bronchitis that subside after cessation of use. On the other hand, habitual use of marijuana alone does not appear to … ]]>