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And unfortunately, there’s no way to look at a seed and be able to tell what sex it is. Unfortunately, you can’t tell a cannabis plant’s sex for sure by looking at the seeds 🙁 How to Figure out Sex of a Cannabis Plant by Examining Pre-flowers. Vegetating plants usually reveal their sex when they’re just 3-6 weeks old from seed, but you have to know where to look. What you’re looking for is “pre-flowers.” These are tiny versions of adult sex parts, and when you see them you can tell what sex the plant is going to be.

They usually show up in the upper parts of the plant, closer to the lights, but sometimes you’ll search the whole plant and only find a pre-flower on a random branch lower down on the plant. Vegetating cannabis plants reveal their sex with “pre-flowers” that usually appear 3-6 weeks from when the plant first germinated. Although these are the general shapes of male and female pre-flowers, if you continue looking through the pictures below, you’ll see there’s quite a bit of variation on what pre-flowers look like from strain to strain. Most male plants have grown a pre-flower by week 3-4 from seed, while female plants don’t show until week 4-6. Basically, all vegetative plants will have revealed their sex by about the 6th week from seed. So, without further ado, here are pictures showing what you’re looking for when it comes to pre-flowers. Remember, pre-flowers are found at the V where stems meet a main stalk. But pre-flowers don’t usually show up all over the plant. Make sure to look around in different places, especially near the top of the plant and closer to the lights.

Note: Pre-flowers show up most often near the top of the plant and closer to the lights but could be anywhere on the plant. There may be just one on the whole plant so you may have to search all over! Male pre-flowers tend to have a “spade” shape, like the spades from a deck of playing cards. Male cannabis plants often (but not always) reveal their sex sooner than female plants. Male pre-flowers tend to be shaped somewhat like a spade. This male plant was only 3 weeks when it made its first pre-flower. Notice how tiny it is compared to the giant-sized thumb! Often it’s unclear what the sex is when a pre-flower is this small (unless you’ve got a lot of experience) so if you’re not sure, it’s a good idea to wait and see how it develops, just in case. Just to give you an idea how small these can be when they show up… This is the exact same picture as above, but with the pre-flower made bigger so you can see it. Male pre-flowers are basically immature pollen sacs. When the plant starts flowering, they will grow and turn into bunches that almost look like grapes. I’ve also noticed that sometimes (though not always!) the stipules on male plants seem more “leafy” and less “pointy” than stipules on female plants (the stipules are the green hair-like growths near where pre-flowers show up). However, this is just a generality, and should be used together with other factors to determine if a plant is male! There are definitely male plants with pointy stipules and vice versa, but it’s sort of a general difference. This particular pre-flower is really tough to determine. Just like the above male plant, sometimes you get almost what looks like two tiny little leaves that the pre-flower pollen sac “unfurls” from. In the above picture the pollen sac is still mostly hidden, while in this next picture, the tiny growths have opened up to fully reveal the pollen sac. This can be confusing because these extra growths don’t appear on all plants, and are not a pre-flower or a stipule. Here’s another male pollen sac pre-flower that’s on a little “stem” A single male pre-flower appears. Once you see multiple pollen sacs and no white pistils, you can be confident it’s a male plant. Although this plant ended up being male, the stipules are long, pointy and crossed as you’d normally see with a female plant. That’s why you need to confirm sex with the pre-flowers and not just look at other factors on the plant! Sometimes the pollen sacs look a little unusual when they first start growing in, but you know it’s male when you see several pre-flowers without any pistils stacked on top of each other like bunches of grapes. If you click the following picture and zoom in close, you can see pollen sacs scattered among the leaves.

This is what male pollen sacs look like when the plant actually starts flowering. This male cannabis plant has gotten further along in the flowering stage. This is what a male plant looks like at maturity when it’s starting to spill its pollen. Another example of pollen spilling onto a nearby leaf. For those who’ve never seen a male cannabis plant in its full glory 🙂 Ok, now that you know what male pre-flowers look like, what do female pre-flowers look like? Female pre-flowers tend to be longer and narrower than male pre-flowers, sometimes with a fat bottom.

They also usually (but not always) have 1-2 white hairs (pistils) sticking out from the top. Sometimes it takes a few extra days for the pistils to appear. Wispy white pistils are a sure sign that you’re looking at female pre-flowers. This pre-flower doesn’t have a pistil sticking out at first, but the shape helps tell you it’s a female plant. If you’re not sure about sex after spotting a pre-flower, it’s a good idea to wait and see for a little while, just to see if a white hair appears (which means it’s definitely a girl) Another example of female cannabis pre-flowers that haven’t revealed their pistil yet.

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