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bad weed never dies

Wisdom of the Day 9: Mala hierba nunca muere

Buenos Dias familia,

Back again with another Wisdom of the Day for y’all. So, for those who don’t know, in this thread, we will discuss the proverb or expression, your understanding, and its translation. I also noticed some have even offered phrases that serve as synonyms, THAT’S GREAT! As well, pictures are always welcome! Your participation is what makes this fun and keeps the learning locomotive running.

19 Answer s

One more try. A bad person just keeps showing up. You just cannot get rid of them. Evil seems to be outweighing good. It is like they are a bad seed or a bad penny. Every time you turn around, there they are again.

I promise. this is my last try, lol

Only the good die young.

Como soy una persona medio optimista, yo lo entiendo un poco diferente. Tal vez podemos verlo del lado positivo también. aunque no sea tan querida y cuidada como una planta casera chocha, una mala hierba nunca muere. Significa que a pesar de todos los obstáculos en su camino, que sea feita y rechazada, la mala hierba se pone fuerte y logra sobrevirir!

¡Qué viva la mala hierba!

As quite an optimistic person, I understand it differently. Maybe we could see this from a positive angle as well. although it may not be as loved and looked after as a spoilt house plant, a weed never dies. This means that, in the face of many obstacles, be it ugly or unloved, a weed stays strong and managed to survive!

Long live weeds!

This seemed to be a tricky one, so I thought it would be something cool to provide some history, and the meaning intended. I hope y’all enjoy this as much as I did. Language is so interesting.

“Hierba mala nunca muere” means always “Bad people last longer”.

We all know the person who seems to break all the rules and get away with it. Perhaps they do, perhaps they don’t, but perception is sometimes more potent than reality. This saying dates from the time when people had strong religious convictions and they were puzzled as to why some people appeared to get away with wrongdoing – hence the put-down of the Devil looking after them on Earth but hinting that they would get their comeuppance in Hell.

If you have a good friendship you will probably call your friends bad stuff sometimes because everybody knows you don’t actually mean it. That’s one context where you can use that sentence, though like what’s explained above it’s not the real intended meaning of this proverb.

If y’all like this, and find it useful, I’ll bring more to the table at the end of the challenge for that day after the answer is accepted.

Buenos Dias familia, Back again with another Wisdom of the Day for y'all. So, for those who don't know, in this thread, we will discuss the proverb or expression, your understanding, and its translation. I also noticed some have even offered phrases …

Venezuelan Sayings

My Venezuelan husband often uses colloquialisms from his culture to describe situations we find ourselves in. These are my illustrations of them. I am also collecting dichos from all Venezuelans, so feel free to send suggestions if you see one missing! Consider them “más criollo que una arepa.” **All images by Daisy Patton http://daisypatton.com

Hierba mala nunca muere.

Translation: Bad weed never dies, meaning nothing bad ever happens to mean people.

Example: I don’t know how that raccoon keeps coming back after we set up traps, I guess a bad weed never dies.

Note: Sorry that I’m slow responding to some emails/messages…we lost our beloved pet this weekend after a bad weekish, so I’m still trying to catch up.

Hierba mala nunca muere. Translation: Bad weed never dies, meaning nothing bad ever happens to mean people. Example: I don’t know how that raccoon keeps coming back after we set up traps, I guess a…