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If you're growing hydroponically (directly in water, or in a soil-less medium like coco coir), it is essential that you provide all the nutrients your plant needs right from the beginning. You've probably seen 'N-P-K' numbers on the bottles of pretty much every nutrient line there is. These number are important to know since cannabis plants use more N (nitrogen) in the vegetative phase, and relatively more P & K (phosphorus & potassium) in the flowering phase. Conversely, giving your plant too much N in the flowering phase will actually slow down bud production. This means that you will harvest smaller yields of less-dense buds in addition to waiting longer for said buds!

This is why you need to either mix your nutrients by hand, or choose a nutrient system that is specifically formulated for the flowering stage of a plant like marijuana. By providing the right nutrients at the right time, you'll reduce your overall time to harvest. How Much Time Per Week Does It Take To Grow Cannabis? Now that you're equipped with the information to get you to harvest as soon as possible, let's quickly address another common question we receive about time. Growers often write in to ask us how much time it will take per week to grow a marijuana plant. We understand that many of you have busy schedules, and want to know if growing your own weed is a realistic goal for you. The amount of time spent growing varies greatly depending on the method you use to grow, the size you let your plants get and the skill of the grower.

But that doesn't mean there isn't a growing method that's conducive to spending less time plant-tending. The truth is, you can grow weed in only 20-30 minutes a week when you use the right techniques and get used to the process of growing. The following article reveals the best way we know to grow lots of potent bud while using a minimum amount of time to do so. We make this happen using a hydroponic style of growing known as Top-fed DWC (aka "bubbleponics"). Keep in mind that this is a fairly advanced technique, and should only be attempted by intermediate-advanced growers or particularly brave newcomers. About Nebula Haze: Medical m arijuana has had a huge impact on my life, and I'm dedicated to showing you how easy it can be to grow your own medical-grade buds. I have made it my mission in life to make growing information available to anyone, both new and advanced growers, while also working to get marijuana legalized for all adults. Bat guano, or feces, has a long history of use as a soil enricher. It is obtained from only fruit and insect-feeding species. It’s fast-acting, has little odor, and can be worked into the soil prior to planting or during active growth. Let’s learn more about how to use bat guano as a fertilizer. It can be used as a soil conditioner, enriching the soil and improving drainage and texture. Bat guano is a suitable fertilizer for plants and lawns, making them healthy and green. It can be used as a natural fungicide and controls nematodes in the soil as well. In addition, bat guano makes an acceptable compost activator, speeding up the decomposition process. As a fertilizer, bat dung can be used as top dressing, worked into the soil, or made into tea and used with regular watering practices. Typically, this fertilizer is applied in smaller quantities than other types of manure. Bat guano provides a high concentration of nutrients to plants and the surrounding soil. According to the NPK of bat guano, its concentration ingredients are 10-3-1. This NPK fertilizer analysis translates to 10 percent nitrogen (N), 3 percent phosphorus (P), and 1 percent potassium or potash (K). The higher nitrogen levels are responsible for fast, green growth. Phosphorus aids with root and flower development while potassium provides for the plant’s overall health. Note : You may also find bat guano with higher phosphorus ratios, such as 3-10-1. Also, it’s believed that the diet of some bat species may have an effect. For example, those feeding strictly on insects produce higher nitrogen content, whereas fruit-eating bats result in a high phosphorus guano. The NPK of bat guano makes it acceptable for use on various plants.

An easy way to apply this fertilizer is in tea form, which allows for deep root feeding. The bat dung is simply steeped in water overnight and then it’s ready for use when watering plants. While many recipes exist, a general bat guano tea contains about a cup of dung per gallon of water. Mix together and after sitting overnight, strain the tea and apply to plants. However, as a fertilizer, this type of manure is one of the best ways to go in the garden.

Not only will your plants love it, but your soil will too. Guanos — the excrement from birds and bats — are among nature's best! Particularly high in nitrogen and phosphorus, guano fertilizers are excellent for use around fruiting and flowering plants. They're also high in trace minerals, providing well-rounded nutrition and they're great for making growth-boosting liquid teas!

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