auto dark devil

The events just described constitute what is called the double-fertilization process, one of the characteristic features of all flowering plants. In the orchids and in some other plants with minute seeds that contain no reserve materials, endosperm formation is completely suppressed. In other cases it is greatly reduced, but the reserve materials are present elsewhere—e.g., in the cotyledons, or seed leaves, of the embryo, as in beans, lettuce, and peanuts, or in a tissue derived from the nucellus, the perisperm, as in coffee. Other seeds, such as those of beets, contain both perisperm and endosperm.

The seed coat, or testa, is derived from the one or two protective integuments of the ovule. The ovary, in the simplest case, develops into a fruit. In many plants, such as grasses and lettuce, the outer integument and ovary wall are completely fused, so seed and fruit form one entity; such seeds and fruits can logically be described together as “dispersal units,” or diaspores. More often, however, the seeds are discrete units attached to the placenta on the inside of the fruit wall through a stalk, or funiculus. The hilum of a liberated seed is a small scar marking its former place of attachment. The short ridge (raphe) that sometimes leads away from the hilum is formed by the fusion of seed stalk and testa. In many seeds, the micropyle of the ovule also persists as a small opening in the seed coat.

The embryo, variously located in the seed, may be very small (as in buttercups) or may fill the seed almost completely (as in roses and plants of the mustard family). It consists of a root part, or radicle, a prospective shoot (plumule or epicotyl), one or more cotyledons (one or two in flowering plants, several in Pinus and other gymnosperms), and a hypocotyl, which is a region that connects radicle and plumule. A classification of seeds can be based on size and position of the embryo and on the proportion of embryo to storage tissue; the possession of either one or two cotyledons is considered crucial in recognizing two main groups of flowering plants, the monocotyledons and the eudicotyledons. Bubble hash refers to collecting hash from your weed (or trim) by submerging the weed in ice-cold water and agitating it. This causes trichomes to break off so you can collect them. Whenever you hear the word ‘hash’, it’s just referring to the extracted resin glands (trichomes, the sticky sparkly stuff) of a cannabis plant. The ‘bubble’ part refers to the method of using cold water and agitation to extract that resin. The perceived potency of bubble hash is just…great! In my opinion, it feels noticeably stronger than dry-sift, kief or dry-ice hash. Bubble hash is safe to make since there are no flammable ingredients or chemical reactions when making it. It’s also safe to enjoy as no chemicals are used during the extraction process. It’s a great use of trim, though making dry-ice hash is easier and produces greater yields. The cornerstone of making bubble hash is mixing up your weed, water and ice. All three of these methods produce the same quality of bubble hash. It’s the efficiency and amount of work that varies. (Old School) Manual Method: Using a spoon or rubber spatula and hand mixing for a while. Pros: Cheapest method, needs the least amount of tools. Cons: The most physical work and the least efficient. Mixer Method: Using a hand mixer with beaters attached, or a hand drill with a paint-mixer or similar tool attached. This method is much easier then hand-mixing and more efficient. Cons: Still need a drill or mixer plus a good mixing attachment that’s also long. A hash-washing machine (mini washing machines) Pros: Easiest method since you don’t have to mix. Also, the most efficient method since all the material is constantly mixed while the machine is on. Cons: High initial cost since you have to buy the machine ( Here’s a short video of a washer in action.

Two 7lb bags of ice Your dried cannabis (bud or trim) Bubble Hash Bags with 25-micron drying sheet (preferably all-mesh) Tip: Get a pack of 25-micron drying screens and dry each of your various grades of hash on their own sheet. This makes it way easier to dry and keep your grades separated. 2 clean buckets A metal tablespoon A sink area with a sprayer.

A clean mister or a simple cup can be used if you don’t have a sprayer A way to mix the hash-water Manual: A long cooking spoon or a rubber spatula, some patience and calories to burn. Hand Mixer or Drill: A hand-mixer (like you would use for cakes) with beaters attached, or a hand drill with a paint mixer attached A hash-washer.

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