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If you go with a Dremel, stick to a more simple, tried-and-true shape like a billiard, apple. Anything much more complex would be pushing the limits in our opinion. These technically can get the job done, but that’s really pushing it.

If all you had to work with was files and rasps it would take quite a long time to finish and the end product wouldn’t look as polished. Regardless, files and rasps are essential additions to any one of the shaping methods/tools above. They are necessary for getting in and removing briar from tight spaces that would otherwise be nearly impossible with just the above tools. Only move on to this step until you have your shape completely defined using one of the above shaping methods. If you get ants in your pants and move on to early, thinking you can remove a lot of the remaining unwanted briar with sand paper, you will realize that you were stupid. At this point, buckle in, put some music on and get ready to sand your fingerprints away. Ok, we’re being dramatic, but this is both a tedious and extremely important stage.

Starting with 120 grit sandpaper, you are going to be sanding every nook and cranny of your pipe. Then move onto 220, 320, 500, and finally (if you want it to be literally as smooth as a baby’s bottom) 600 grit. Trust us, if you don’t sand diligently with every grit, you WILL be surprised at how many scratches are left after the final buffing that you could not see while sanding. If that isn’t that important to you, than no worries. The pipe makers stain of choice is Fiebings leather dye. It comes in a variety of colors and if none of those suit your fancy, you can mix them to your heart’s content. Pre-staining is optional, but does lead to a finished pipe with greater grain contrast. It involves staining the whole pipe in black, or a darker dye color, and then sanding it away, with the highest grit you finished sanding at, until only the stain deeply absorbed into the grain remains. Whether you pre-stain or not, final staining comes next. Using a pipe cleaner, stain the whole pipe with your desired color, working quickly so you don’t get a blotchy finish. One coat usually does the trick, but if you want a darker finish go for a second. Oh, and our friend Wayne Teipen would be disappointed with us if we didn’t stress the fact that you should never stain your chamber! Just stick a cork in the chamber (no joke) before you begin and then stain away. Let the pipe dry to the touch (about 10 minutes if it’s not very humid) before continuing. Now ideally you would have a benchtop buffing setup for this. We use a bench grinder with the guards and grinding stones removed, replaced with muslin and flannel buffing wheels. If you don’t have this setup, you can get miniature buffing wheels for your Dremel/rotary tool. You’ll want to get yourself some red or brown tripoli compound and carnauba wax. Get your buffing wheels spinning and hold the tripoli compound up to the muslin wheel for just a couple of seconds to apply it to the wheel. Bring your pipe up to the wheel (steady now) and begin to buff the whole pipe. Make sure you have a firm grip on the pipe and don’t push it into the wheel too aggressively or it will rip it out of your hands and bounce it all over your shop (as Phil can attest to MANY times). Tripoli compound is actually a very very fine abrasive that removes teeny tiny scratches from the surface of the pipe. Finally, repeat on the flannel wheel with the carnauba wax. This is when your work will really start to shine and your diligent sanding proved, because if your pipe still has scratches, this is when they will show up.

7 Ways To Prevent & Heal Windburn, According To Experts.

When it comes to the effects that winter weather can have on your skin, windburn is easily one of the worst. So whether you like to spend your time skiing or even just have to walk a couple blocks to school or work, it's helpful to know ways to prevent windburn. Of course, you should also be aware of ways to heal it just in case the wind gets the better of you anyway. To find out some of the best ways to shield and save your skin, I emailed with a few experts.

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